Brew Day: 8/04/14
Bottle Day: 8/26/14

Original Gravity: 1.072
Final Gravity: 1.003
Estimated ABV: 9.06%

Ingredients:

  • 5 lbs pure, raw and unprocessed honey
  • 3.15 lbs light malt extract syrup
  • 1 lb extra light dry malt extract
  • 1 gallon organic, unfiltered, pasteurized apple juice
  • 3 oz Mt. Hood hop pellets
  • Yeast

Brew Day — 8/04/14

1. Sanitize all equipment.

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2. Combine 2 gallons of warm tap water with the entire contents of the honey jar. Mix until completely dissolved.

3. Add apple juice to honey mixture.

4. Begin boil of 2 gallons of water.

5. When the water is boiling, add all malt extract.

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6. Add hops:

  • 0:60 – 1 oz Mt. Hood
  • 0:30 – 1 oz Mt. Hood
  • 0:05 –  1 oz Mt. Hood

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7. After an hour of boiling cease the boil and cool wort. Transfer the wort to fermenting bucket, which is holding the honey apple mixture.

8. Pitch yeast.

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Bottle Day — 8/26/14

1. Sanitize all equipment.

2. Transfer beer into bottling bucket.

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3. Fill bottles and cap, fill growlers and cap, set in the closet to carbonate.

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MMM, what to say about this delicious one?? Our apple ale was really tasty, our honey ale from earlier in the summer was delicious, why not combine it all? This was a really high gravity beer, which is probably explained by the great amount of malt that we put into two gallons in the boil as well as a high-sugar mixture of honey and apple juice. The flavor was evenly spread between all three pieces, which was really awesome. There was the tart and sweet apple cider flavor; the sweet, dry flavor of the honey; the malty, hoppy, beery characteristics of the beer. You could taste the high alcohol content in the aftertaste–almost the fire-breath sensation after taking a shot. A pint of Honey Apple Ale and you will feel a little loopy. Two pints and it’s a party!

Race Day: August 2, 2014 – 8:30am

After an outstanding race in Chisago a week before, I was more excited than ever to defend my Brewhouse Short Course title. I had won the race three times in a row and going for number four. Although there is always the chance of a ringer coming in for the win, I had had this race locked down really well all three times. The biggest threat in my mind was Nick, Assistant Manager at Duluth Running Co., and running phenom. We had been training more and more and more together during the spring and summer and I finally convinced him to dip his toes in the tri game. He had pretty good results at Timberman short course, finishing second, but had recently dropped stacks on a tri bike and wetsuit. In the tri game, you can buy speed.

During the week, I went on a couple of short, fast rides, and kept my running up. My race strategy is pretty fail-proof, so I went with it again–start really fast in the swim to get out front, hold a blistering pace in the water and come out the leader. Keep the lead on the bike and put a lot of time on any fast runners, then leave it all on the run course by starting fast and ending fast.

Everything looked good in transition. The weather was literally perfect. I got a little swim warmup in and the gun went off. I really pushed it hard on the way out to the first buoy in the thin rectangled-shaped swim course. I think I was the first to turn, tried to sight smartly on the next short section. I think I was still in first turning the last buoy, and tried to look back and stack up the competition. Nobody on my heels. On the home stretch, I was breathing really heavy only on one side and tried to keep it tight and fast. When I got to the beach, I looked back and there wasn’t anyone even close. I had the perfect swim. Now to go to work.

After a speedy transition, I hopped on my bike. It took a second to get my feet into my bike shoes. I’ve been careful with this after popping the shoe off a few times. That takes much more time than carefully getting my feet in. Once I was locked in, I brought it to the pain locker. I focused on smooth, round pedal strokes and to generate as much power as possible. At the turnaround, there wasn’t anyone that close to me. Some of the closer guys to me weren’t able to run with me, so I was specifically looking for Nick, who would surely out run me. He was in 10th place or so when I saw him, and my confidence soared. As long as I could crush it on the way back, the run would be a piece of cake.

I rushed through T2 as fast as humanly possible and was out on the run. I tried to keep my legs turning over as fast as possible… it’s hard to get that pure speed, all out anaerobic feeling after biking, no matter what the distance. As long as Nick isn’t breathing down my neck… I hit the turnaround and didn’t see anyone even close to me. Once I got back onto the road (the turnaround is a lollipop shape), I saw Nick cruising really fast, but he was too far off. I knew I had it in the bag, but kept pushing just in case. The finish chute was ecstatic.

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After catching my breath, I turned around and saw Nick coming in fast. Wow, he picked a TON of people off on the run. He put two and a half minutes on me on the run, and I had the second fasted run. This was a 5k run, by the way.

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I was happy to have two awesome triathlon races in a row and also to uphold my title as Brewhouse Short Course champion.

Results

Race Stats:
Wetsuit: Blueseventy Helix (from, like, 2007)
Bike: Specialized Transition AL
Shoes: Brooks Pureflow 3
Time: 1:02:24
Swim: 12:04
Pace: 1:29
Bike: 30:52
Rate: 24.1
Run: 17:42
Pace: 5:43
Place: 1/207


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